Jumping the Shark: Knowing When to Say ‘The End’

“I loved Grey’s Anatomy until I realised I hate it.”

A friend of mine and I were discussing our favourite television programmes recently when she came out with that little gem. Then we were off on a rant about how shows can start so well, be so compelling and then one evening as you settle into the couch you realise that you don’t even like your favourite programme anymore.

  • Grey’s Anatomy went from being a comedy/drama about a young woman struggling to both fulfill and reject her familial legacy to a mess of explosions, mass shootings, plane crashes, natural disasters and anything else that could hike up drama to obscure the lack of plot.
  • 24 went from the story of a day in the life of a counterintelligence agent pushing the boundaries to stop a terrorist attack to the same thing, over and over and over again.
  • The Inbetweeners went from the coming of age story of four boys at school to…oh, wait. That’s exactly what it was.

People often lament that US television shows go on for too long and fizzle out whereas UK programmes ‘leave the viewers wanting more.’ But do we actually want more? I think not.

We may feel we want more, because Tuesday nights just won’t be the same without the characters we have come to love. Because we crave more of the laughs or the tears or the shocks the writers have delivered. But what we really love is the story. And it’s important to know when a story is over.

In Grey’s Anatomy, the story is: will the aspiring surgeon succeed or will she fall prey to her inner demons? She’s succeeded. She’s a surgeon, she’s got the guy, they’ve built the house of their dreams, she’s triumphed over difficulties in getting pregnant, for goodness sakes, she even owns the hospital now. The answer is there. The story is over. A long time over.

24 was a great premise: one day, 24 hours and the problem that one character faces in that time. Except then they did it again and again, year after year with the same protagonist and the same problem. That’s not a story, there is no character development when the protagonist just repeats the same actions every season. Plus, it’s just ridiculous that one character would single-handedly need to resolve that many terrorist attacks, and all in exactly 24 hours.

And, now, we come to hailed success stories like The Inbetweeners and How I Met Your Mother. Why do these shows work? Because they have limited scope. There is a point when they end. The inbetweener boys finish school and Ted, presumably meets his kids’ mother.

All this to say that it is time for me to jump the shark. It has been a great year for me on No Dead White Men. I have enjoyed working with all the tutors, with our outgoing MFA director, Scott Bradfield, and my talented and dedicated cohort colleagues who took time out to write fantastic articles all year. They have written about varied topics from translation to procrastination, from teaching to reading and everything in between.

As we move on and a new cohort steps in, we think about beginning new scenes, new projects and bringing the old ones to a close. Because those endings are so very important and the ending is the hardest part to write because, in many ways, it defines the whole story.

So we’re going to end simply, with a thank you for reading and a hope that we haven’t gone on quite long enough to make you hate us.

Don’t forget to keep visiting No Dead White Men as it is taken over by the 2013/2014 MFA cohort and they tell their own, new story. I am sure they will be fantastic and have lots of interesting thoughts to share.

Thank you all for your loyal readership and support.

Your faithful 2012/2013 Editor,

Sinéad Keegan

Advertisements

Learning to Quit Books

Sinéad Keegan is an Irish-born writer in the final year of her MFA at Kingston and currently writing her first novel. Her short stories and poetry and have been published in several magazines and she blogs at www.sineadkeegan.com. Twitter: @sineadkeegan. She is the editor of No Dead White Men and recently taught a course in blogging and social media for Kingston Writing School.

************************

In the true spirit of blogging, I am going to make a confession.

It will perhaps come as no surprise that I have always loved reading. I devoured all the assigned books when I was in school. I loved many of them, disliked some of them but read all of them. While my classmates bought Cliff’s Notes for Crime and Punishment, I wrapped myself in Dostoyevsky’s language. When they watched the film of Great Expectations, I sought out more of Dickens’s novels. I read anything and everything I put my hand to and never quit. Real readers don’t quit.

So, for many years now I have lived with the great shame of not having finished Gulliver’s Travels. I was sixteen when it was assigned to me and I hated it. I read Lilliput and just thought it was unbelievably dull. This, from a teenager who counted The Return of the Native among her favourite books.

Until just this year it was the only book I’d ever failed to finish. But I have a new outlook now. I was having a chat with science fiction novelist Christopher Priest this spring when he mentioned that he only reads books that he loves. When I explained my guilt-reading, he squashed the idea firmly. He said that there are a finite number of books that you can read in your lifetime so you had better be sure you enjoy the reading that you do.

Reading had previously seemed an infinite activity. So many books and all the days in the world to spend curled up with them. Suddenly, I was aware of my literary mortality. He had me calculate the number of books I could possibly read if I kept reading at my current pace and lived to eighty. He assured me you slow down as you age, so the number was optimistic. My best case scenario number is 3,000. At first glance, this seems enormous, but surely there are more than 3,000 great books that I would love.

I take Chris’s point. In fact, he’s absolutely right and I’ve quit two books since I had that conversation. But I still hear that nagging voice urging me to persevere. The conflict rages. One of the books I’m claiming to have quit is still sitting on the end table in my “to read” pile with a bookmark at page 212. I’m less than halfway through, but I still devoted hours to struggling through a book that I genuinely dislike. I should have quit at page 1. The problem is that it came highly recommended by a dear friend and excellent novelist. In over a decade, she has never steered me wrong on books, so I tell myself that I just need to give this book another thirty pages or another twenty or just one more chapter.

I tell myself that the recommendation is the problem, but that’s not true. The problem is the guilt. I don’t want to be a person who leaves books unfinished. A reading quitter. So I remind myself that I am only reading the glorious novel I am right now because I have put that other one aside.

Now, before everyone gets all up in arms about the value of reading what you don’t like, relax. I know exactly why I don’t like this book and I’ll try not to do those things in my writing. Proper, intellectual, writer-ly activity done. Now I’m moving on to great literature that I also love. I feel confident I’m learning more from that than I would from wading through another 300 pages of a story and writing that I hate.

So, I give unto you all the permission to read widely, read voraciously, read what you love, quit what you don’t like and to do it all guilt free. Count how many books you hopefully have left in your life and spend that number wisely!

Let us know in the comments section what your book number is and what’s at the top of your “must read” list!

Georgia Fitch: Playwright, Radio Scriptwriter and Screenwriter

Georgia Fitch

Georgia Fitch is an East London-born playwright. She began her career as an actress and started writing in order to create more interesting roles that represented the women she knew. Initially, Georgia partnered with Tracy O’Flaherty and they had their first major success with The Footballer’s Wife (1997). Georgia has since independently written numerous plays for the stage and radio as well as a television drama. She is most well-known for Adrenalin Heart (2002) which premiered at the Bush and then went on to be performed at the Tokyo Theatre Festival in 2004.

Georgia was  Writer in Residence at the Bush Theatre, London, with O’Flaherty in 2001. In 2004, she was Writer in Residence at BBC Radio. From 2006 to 2008, she was on attachment to the Royal Court and Soho Theatre. She is currently Writer-in-Residence at Kingston University.

Her most recent work, Blair’s Children, co-written with April de Angelis, Anders Lustgarten, Mark Norfolk and Paula Stanic, opened at The Cockpit Theatre, Marylebone on 05 June 2013 and runs until 21 June 2013. You can find more information and purchase tickets for Blair’s Children here.

******************************

Bibliography:

Plays:

Blair’s Children – The Cockpit Theatre, 2013

Fit and Proper People – Soho Theatre/RSC, 2011

Dirty Dirty Princess – National Theatre, New Connections, 2009

I Like Mine with a Kiss – Bush Theatre, 2007

Adrenalin  Heart – Bush Theatre, 2002,2004

Alone – Etc Theatre, 2000

Arrivals – Old Red Lion, 1999

Come Dancing – (Co-written with Tracy O’Flaherty) Old Red Lion, 1998

The Footballer’s Wife – (Co-written with Tracy O’Flaherty) Riverside Studios, 1997

Radio:

Up The Junction– BBC Radio 4 – 2013

The Mother of – BBC Radio 4, 2007

Untitled Lover – BBC Radio 4, 2007
Fortunes Always Hiding – BBC Radio 4, 2005

Romeo and Juliet in Southwark –  BBC, 2004

Produced in collaboration with Shakespeare’s Globe and Kingsdale School, Dulwich

Adrenalin Heart – BBC Radio 3, 2003

Television:

Darke Town – (Co-written with Lucy Catherine and Ryan Craig) BBC Drama, 2006

Other:

Dis-Assembly – (An installation created with Runa Islam) Sepentine Gallery, 2006

********************

Recommended Reading:

Plays to read:

A Raisin in the Sun – Lorraine Hansberry

The Visit – Fredrich Durrenmatt

Saved – Edward Bond

Whistle in the Dark – Tom Murphy

Ecstasy – Mike Leigh

Masterpieces – Sarah Daniels

Films to view:

Cathy Come Home – Ken Loach

Nil by Mouth – Gary Oldman

A Seperation – Asghar Farhadi

Source Materials:

How Plays Work – David Edgar

The Art Of Dramatic Writing – Lajos Egri

The Writers Journey – Christopher Vogler

The Hero’s Journey – Joseph Campbell

Dark nights of the Soul – Thomas Moore

MFAs to be published in RiPPLE

This Wednesday, 1 May will see the launch of RiPPLE, Kingston University’s annual literary anthology, published by Kingston University Press. We are proud to announce that there are several MFAs featured in this year’s publication. Some of them will also be reading at the launch so you can hear what we’re really made of. We invite you all to join us at 7pm on Wednesday in Woody’s Bar & Kitchen for a celebratory evening filled with good writing.

RiPPLE Launch

7pm

Wednesday, 1 May 2013

Woody’s Bar & Kitchen

5 Ram Passage, Kingston upon Thames KT1 1HH

 

MFAs published in RiPPLE 2013:

Kristin Durinick

Lucy Furlong

Neil Horabin

Sinéad Keegan

Ryan Licata

Beatrice Parvin

 

MFAs reading at the event:

Beatrice Parvin – Love Letters and Asparagus

Sinéad Keegan – Desert Children

 

Ripple Invite

MFA Dissertation Module Guide – 2013

Following, please find the official module guide for the 2013 MFA Dissertation. This includes requirements, reading lists and an explanation of the dissertation for several forms (Poetry, prose, drama etc.).

More

Christopher Priest

Christopher Priest

Christopher Priest is an English writer of novels, short stories, biographies, critical works and more. He has written radio drama for BBC Radio 4, television programs for Thames TV and HTV and his reviews and features have been published in the Guardian, The Times, the Scotsman and other broadsheets and numerous magazines.

His 1995 novel, The Prestige, won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and, in 2006, was made into a film of the same name starring Christian Bale, Hugh Jackman and Scarlett Johannson. Christopher Nolan directed and it was nominated for two Academy Awards.

Christopher has garnered several international awards, including the Eurocon Award (Yugoslavia), the Kurd Lasswitz Award (Germany), the Ditmar Award (Australia) and Le Grand Prix de L’Imaginaire (France). In 2001, he was awarded France’s Prix Utopia for lifetime achievement. In 2002, he won both the Arthur C. Clarke Award and the British Science Fiction Association (BSFA) Award for his novel The Separation. The Islanders won the 2011 BSFA Award and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award. The Adjacent will be released in June.

Find out more about Christopher on his website: http://www.christopher-priest.co.uk/

 

*******************************************

Christopher will be reading at 7:30pm on Tuesday, 23 April 2013 in JG 3003, Kingston University, Penrhyn Road. This is a free reading and open to the public.

*******************************************

 

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Fiction

The Adjacent (June 2013)

The Islanders (2011)

The Separation (2002)

The Prestige (1995)

The Quiet Woman (1990)

The Glamour (1988)

The Affirmation (1981)

An Infinite Summer (1979)

The Space Machine (1976)

Fugue for a Darkening Island (1972)

Indoctrinaire (1970)

 

Essays

‘Top Ten Slipstream Books’, The Guardian, May 2003

‘John Wyndham and H G Wells’, a talk given at Midhurst, West Sussex in December 2000

 ‘Independent Cinemas’, The Independent, 1999

 ‘The Beatles’, Chuch, 1986

 

*********************************************

 

Christopher Priest’s Recommended Reading List

 

NON-FICTION:

A Sort of Life – Graham Greene

(The first volume of Greene’s autobiography, this is in my experience the only book

that tells the truth about what it is to be a writer.)

Bomber County – Daniel Swift

(About the poetry written by combatants in the second world war.)

The King’s English – Kingsley Amis

(A book of English usage, idiosyncratic and amusing.)

Song of the Sky – Guy Murchie

(A lyrical account of the nature of the sky: winds, clouds, storms, etc.)

 

FICTION:

Disappearances – William Wiser

Loitering with Intent – Muriel Spark

Larry’s Party – Carol Shields

Pavane – Keith Roberts

Collected Stories – Vladimir Nabokov

Pale Fire – Vladimir Nabokov

The Painted Bird – Jerzy Kosinski

Fame – Daniel Kehlmann

Ice – Anna Kavan

Dubliners – James Joyce

The Magus – John Fowles

2666 – Roberto Bolaño

The Voices of Time – J. G. Ballard

Paul Maliszewski

Paul Maliszewski

The MFA Residency Series is delighted to welcome back our first returning Resident, Paul Maliszewski. Paul was an MFA Resident in 2009 and is now a part of the 2013 MFA Residency Series as well. He is the author of Fakers, a book of essays, and Prayer and Parable, a collection of stories. His stories, criticism and essays have appeared in numerous magazines, journals and anthologies, including Harper’s, The Paris Review, Granta, Bomb, Bookforum and The Baffler. He is the recipient of two Pushcart Prizes. He has also edited an issue of McSweeney’s (2002), Paper Placemats (2004), two issues of Denver Quarterly about real and imagined places (2004) and J&L Illustrated #3 (2012).

Paul earned his MFA in creative writing from Syracuse University and has taught at George Washington University and Johns Hopkins University’s M.A. in Writing program. He lives in Washington, D.C., with his wife and their two sons.

 

Paul will be reading at 7:30pm on Tuesday, 16 April 2013 in JG 3003, Kingston University, Penrhyn Road. This is a free reading and open to the public.

 

Paul’s Suggested Reading List:

Here are some books that are either new-ish or new to me. Readers wanting more of a greatest-of-all-time selection can check out the list I sent for my first visit.

The Talented Mr. Ripley, by Patricia Highsmith

The Letters of William Gaddis, edited by Steven Moore [I reviewed this book and am including it here as a way of sneaking in a gentle reminder: Everyone should read Gaddis’s novel J R.]

Mawrdew Czgowchwz, by James McCourt [I’ve been thinking a lot about the semicolon lately. Apology, a new magazine, which I also recommend, asked me to moderate a discussion on the semicolon, to determine whether it’s an endangered species. I invited some writers, including James McCourt, to contribute short pieces about their use of (or disdain for) the semicolon. There are some beautifully deployed semicolons in Mawrdew Czgowchwz (pronounced “Mardu Gorgeous”) and wonderful writing throughout.]

Collected Body, by Valzhyna Mort [Excellent poems. Her first book, Factory of Tears, is super, too.]

His Wife Leaves Him, by Stephen Dixon [Out soon from Fantagraphics Books. I helped proofread the novel, which I considered an education in storytelling. Dixon is just so quick at starting and stopping his stories, and so artful without seeming the least bit artful. This book is Dixon’s masterpiece.]

An interview with Paul Maliszewski may be found here, on The Paris Review website.

The poet James Wagner recently asked a bunch of writers, “Why do you write?” I responded, or tried, anyway, and so did others.

St. Patrick’s Day the Irish Way

Sinéad Keegan is an Irish-born writer in the final year of her MFA at Kingston and is currently writing her first novel. Her short stories and poetry and have been published in several magazines and she blogs regularly at http://www.sineadkeegan.blogspot.com. She is also the editor of No Dead White Men.

*********************

On this St. Patrick’s Day, before you don your silly shamrock headgear, dig out your “Kiss me, I’m Irish” t-shirt and go drink yourself sick on green beer, spare a thought for a true Irish tradition: the seanachie.

A seanachie (shan-a-KEE, sort of, Irish pronunciation is problematic in English) is a traditional Irish storyteller. In ancient Ireland, they travelled around the country staying with families and, in return for hospitality, they would share stories. It was a way to keep the old myths alive, to teach history and also to share the news of the day. Naturally, with newspapers, television and the internet, the days of the traveling seanachie have mainly passed in Ireland, but tradition of storytelling and being a storyteller is still strong throughout the country and with Irish people across the globe. Instead of traveling down the narrow country roads to different families every night, today seanachies can be found in the local pubs and at every family gathering. When Irish people meet, the first question we ask is, “What’s the story?” Why say what happened when you can tell the story of what happened?

Many of our storytellers have achieved worldwide acclaim, like William Butler Yeats, Bram Stoker, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, George Bernard Shaw and other heavy hitters. But these literary giants are not all Ireland has produced. There are currently some amazing writers coming out of the country, making waves across the literary world and their work is well worth a look. Here is my incredibly biased and far from comprehensive, taster list of five contemporary Irish writers who work across the literary spectrum:

RoomEmma Donoghue – Emma stormed the literary scene in 2010 with Room, which, among its too numerous to list accolades, was shortlisted for the Orange and Man Booker Prizes, won Hughes & Hughes Irish Novel of the Year and the W.H. Smiths Paperback of the Year Awards. Room is the story of a mother and son held captive and is told by the five-year-old boy. This ‘overnight success’ is actually Emma’s seventh novel. This prolific writer has also published several short story collections, literary history articles and anthologies in addition to writing for the screen, stage and radio.

 

Artemis FowlEoin Colfer – Eoin is the author of the incredibly successful Artemis Fowl series for young adults. Artemis is a hyper-intelligent teen with a troubled family who tries to outwit the characters of Irish fairy stories. In an interesting twist on the usual young adult formula, Artemis is the bad guy. This series, beginning with the eponymous Artemis Fowl, is intriguing for readers of all ages. In 2008 another of his many novels, The Airman, joined the New York Times bestseller list. With successes like these and even the sixth book of Douglas Adam’s Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, And Another Thing, to his name, Eoin Colfer is a literary name for our times.

 

Dervla Murphy - GazaDervla Murphy – Dervla’s first book, Full Tilt: Ireland to India with a Bicycle (1965), established her as a fearless traveler and extraordinary writer. For more than fifty years she has travelled the world, struggling to get away from the paved road. Her latest book, A Month by the Sea: Encounters in Gaza, took her into the homes and lives of people in Palestine. Dervla hasn’t let anything slow her down, not travel mishaps, resistance from immigration authorities or getting older. She’s now in her eighties and shows no signs of slowing down, which is great news for fans of her work.

 

Blackwater LightshipColm Toibin – A novelist, essayist, memoirist, travel writer, journalist and playwright, there is very little to which Colm hasn’t turned his accomplished hand. Twice shortlisted for the Man Booker for The Blackwater Lightship and The Master, his awards are numerous and include the Encore Award, Ferro-Grumley Prize, the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and the Prix du Meilleur Livre. His work has a quiet power, an extraordinary sense of place and gives his readers new ways in which to view the world.

 

 

The GatheringAnne Enright – Anne’s fourth novel, The Gathering, won the Man Booker Prize in 2007 and her other books and short stories have been widely praised. She has also won the Hughes & Hughes Irish Novel of the Year and the Encore Award. Her picture of Ireland is uncompromising and nuanced, accommodating both the country’s deep history and its modern contradictions.

 

 

So perhaps on this St. Patrick’s day, we can all enjoy a good Irish read beside our pint of Guinness, glass of Bailey’s or measure of Jameson’s. Ireland, its people and its history is so much deeper than this international stereotype of drinking. One look at any of these writers shows this in abundance.

Wendy Cope OBE

Wendy Cope OBE. Photo by Adrian Harvey.

Wendy Cope OBE. Photo by Adrian Harvey.

Wendy Cope is an award-winning English poet renowned for her wit and humour. After reading History at St. Hilda’s College, Oxford, she then spent many years teaching primary school in London, before making the switch to full time freelance writer in 1986. She has been a tutor on a number of Arvon courses and still occasionally runs workshops in academic settings and elsewhere.

Her first collection, Making Cocoa for Kingsley Amis, introduced the world to her clear imagery and biting wit and became a bestseller. She has since published several more collections, which have all been enthusiastically received both by critics and the public. She has also edited a number of poetry anthologies including Is That the New Moon (1989) and The Funny Side: 101 Humorous Poems (1998). Drawing on her experience as a primary school teacher, she has also written a narrative poem, The River Girl (1991) and two children’s books,   Twiddling Your Thumbs (1988) and Going for a Drive (2010).

In 1987 she won a Cholmondeley Award for poetry and in 1995 she was awarded the Michael Braude Award for Light Verse. In 1998, BBC Radio 4 listeners voted her their choice to succeed Ted Hughes at Poet Laureate. If I Don’t Know (2001) was shortlisted for the Whitbread Poetry Award and in 2010 she was made an O.B.E. in the Queen’s Birthday honours. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.

Wendy Cope is part of the 2013 MFA Residency Series. She is also a writer in residence at Kingston Writing School. She regularly works with students and does readings. On 26 February 2013 she taught the MFA Writing and Teaching workshop talking about her experiences, strategies and motivations as a creative writing teacher and also modelling a poetry workshop.

Selected Bibliography

Poetry Collections:

Making Cocoa for Kingsley Amis (1986)

Serious Concerns (1992)

If I Don’t Know (2001)

Family Values (2011)

Narrative Poem

The River Girl (1991)

Edited Anthologies

Is That the New Moon (1989)

The Orchard Book of Funny Poems (1993)

The Funny Side: 101 Humorous Poems (1998)

The Faber Book of Bedtime Stories (1999)

Heaven on Earth: 101 Happy Poems (2001)

 

Books for Children

Twiddling Your Thumbs (1988)

Going for a Drive (2010)

****************

As with all our visiting writers, Wendy has kindly supplied a recommended reading list.

Some books I’ve enjoyed recently:

 

Poetry

Stag’s Leap by Sharon Olds

The Overhaul by Kathleen Jamie

Mountain Home: the Wilderness Poetry of Ancient China, translated by David Hinton

Fiction

The Glass Room by Simon Mawer

Skios by Michael Frayn

Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel

Keras by Simon Rae (a book for children)

Non-fiction

Gig by Simon Armitage

Lamar Herrin – MFA Residency Profile

Lamar Herrin. Photo courtesy of Lamar Herrin

Lamar Herrin. Photo courtesy of Lamar Herrin

Lamar Herrin is an award winning author of numerous novels and his short stories have appeared in various publications including The New Yorker, Harper’s,  and Epoch. His latest work is a memoir entitled, Romancing Spain. In 1985, he received a grant from the National Endowment of the Arts and, in 1991, he won of the Associated Writing Program’s Award for the Novel for The Lies Boys Tell. He is Professor Emeritus of creative writing and contemporary literature at Cornell University where he has taught for twenty-nine years. He and his wife, Amparo, divide their time between Ithaca, New York and Valencia, Spain. Find out more at his website.

He will be reading from his work on Tuesday, February 12, 2013 in the John Galsworthy Building Room 3003 from 7:30-9 pm. The reading will begin promptly at 7:30pm.

Bibliography

Fiction

American Baroque (1981)

The Rio Loja Ringmaster (1983)

The Unwritten Chronicles of Robert E. Lee (1991)

The Lies Boys Tell (1992)

House of the Deaf  (2006)

Fractures (To be published in 2013)                                            

 

Nonfiction

Romancing Spain, A Memoir (2006)

 

STORIES

“The Rio Loja Ringmaster” –  The Paris Review, Fall 1974

“The Rookie Season” – The Paris Review, Summer, 1976

“Our Lady of the Mediterranean” – The Bennington Review, September, 1979

“Age of Retirement” – Epoch, Winter 1979

“For Years Without War” – fiction international, No. 12, 1980

“Her Journey Westward” – The Virginia Quarterly Review, Spring 1981

“From Pure Products” – River Styx, #10, 1982

“A Life of Crime” – The Paris Review, Winter 1982

“Last Respects” – Harper’s Magazine, February 1983

“Monuments” – The New Yorker, October 29, 1990

“A Sweet and Sunny Life” – Columbia Review, 1993

“Casualties” – Epoch, 1998, vol. 47, nos. 2 & 3

“Song and Dance”  – Epoch, 2005, vol. 54, no 3

Source: http://www.lamarherrin.com/

“Everytime I read them, I want to write.”

The books and authors that inspire Lamar Herrin:

As I Lay Dying or anything else by William Faulkner

Thomas Wolfe – (not Tom Wolfe) author of num

erous works including Look Homeward, Angel, The Lost Boy and Mannerhouse: A Play in a Prologue and Four Acts

James Salter – author of novels, short stories, screenplays, poetry, memoir and other nonfiction. Works include Downhill Racer (screenplay), Light Years (novel) and Still Such (poetry).

Cormac McCarthy – author of short stories, screenplays and novels such as No Country for Old Men, All the Pretty HorsesThe Road and The Orchard Keeper.

Previous Older Entries

StatCounter

wordpress stats
%d bloggers like this: