Writer’s Cafe at the Rose Theatre 06 August 2013 with Kayo Chingonyi

The Writer’s Cafe summer reading series returns on Tuesday, 06 August 2013 at 1:15pm. Come, enjoy a coffee and some fantastic writing from spoken word artist Kayo Chingonyi and members of the community. If you have a poem or short selection of prose that fits the theme of “musical words” please come along and share your work! This is a great opportunity to get some exposure and support. You can email vivienneraper@gmail.com to book an open mic slot or just turn up on the day.

Kayo Chingonyi at the Writer's Cafe Flyer

Writer’s Cafes featuring Writer-in-Residence Mark Barrowcliffe and MFA lecturer  James Miller  to follow in September and October with open mic slots every month. Pieces for reading should be no longer than 5 minutes in length.

This is a wonderful opportunity to meet writers, get involved with Kingston Writing School and to get public reading experience if you’re a writer!

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A Look Back at the Kingston Writing School Athens Summer School

For four weeks this summer, writers from around the world gathered in Athens, Greece for intensive creative writing workshops led by Kingston Writing School writers in connection with the British Council.

Athens school logoThis very lucky editor was among the students there for the first week of the session and can attest to just how brilliant it was. Waking up in the ancient city of Athens, spending the day wandering through centuries-old ruins and the evening discussing writing with motivated writers was incredible. Inspiration lay around every corner.

Weekdays from 6-9pm we would gather at the British Council offices in Kolonaki Square, revel in the glorious air conditioning and workshop an incredible array of writing. There were several courses to choose from:

1. 2 week Intensive Prose Writing with novelists Adam Baron and Rachel Cusk

2. 2 week Intensive Poetry Writing with Jane Yeh and Paul Perry

3. 4 week Mixed Genre Writing with James Miller, Siobhan Campbell, Norma Clarke and Jonathan Barnes

4. 2 week Fiction and Poetry Writing with Jonathan Barnes and Alison Gibb

Teaching these classes were: novelists Adam Baron, Rachel Cusk, James Miller and Jonathan Barnes, poets Siobhan Campbell, Jane Yeh and Alison Gibb, and poet and novelist Paul Perry.  Students also benefited from visits from notable Greek writers.

One of the best experiences of the week was not only the amazing teaching, but also the opportunity to connect with other, international writers. The 33 registered students were in classes of between four and eleven writers and were able to socialise and discuss writing with the other classes through organised events. The power of literature in the face of the current economic crisis was evident in the classroom. It was fascinating to hear from Greek writers about the economic and social turmoil, and to see how it was represented in their writing. Students hailed from several countries including Greece, the UK, the USA and Mexico, ranged in age from teenagers to retirees and had professions from novelist to diplomat. The wealth of world and life experience added to the rich discussions of writing and literature.

Many students found that the intensive nature of the course encouraged them to produce more than they normally would have. For those students who struggled to start, the teachers gave writing exercises to kick start creativity. The summer school ended with an impressive and moving evening of readings by participants that highlighted the success of the program.

Huge thanks are due to all of the staff of the British Council and the director, Tony Buckby. Special thanks to Irini Vouzelakou and Maria Papaioannou who did an enormous amount of work to organise everything behind the scenes to make sure the summer school ran so well and to make it all possible. Their hard work and positivity put everyone at ease and made both students and staff feel welcome in Athens and at the British Council. At Kingston University, many thanks to the staff who taught and to David Rogers for his leadership of Kingston Writing School in forging this new bond.

The consensus from the teachers, students, Kingston Writing School and the British Council is that the first year of the Athens International Creative Writing Summer School was a huge success. Director of the Kingston Writing School, David Rogers says, “We have definitely established a special link among Kingston Writing School, the Athens British Council, and our new community of Greek and international writers.”

Kingston Writing School and the British Council look forward to further developing and expanding that community next year when the Athens International Creative Writing Summer School will return as an annual event. So if you missed out this year, not to worry! It is expected that similar creative writing courses will be offered and organisers are looking into possibly offering courses in literature or nonfiction/journalism.For more information, keep your eye on the Kingston Writing School and British Council Athens websites.

Writer’s Cafe – Summer Reading Series 2013

No Dead White Men is delighted to report that the first Writer’s Cafe featuring Nicky Matthews Browne was a success in the lovely setting of the Rose Theatre’s Culture Cafe. Nicky’s reading was well-received as were the readings by the public.

Some of the audience, although they did not intend to participate, felt so inspired as to spontaneously recite poetry from memory.

N M Browne reading at the 10 July 2013 Writer's Cafe

N M Browne reading at the 10 July 2013 Writer’s Cafe

A great time was had by all and we are all looking forward to the events yet to come:

Tuesday, 06 August 2013, 1:15pm – Kayo Chingonyi – “Musical words”

Tuesday, 03 September 2013, 1:15pm – Mark Barrowcliffe – “Devil in the details”

Tuesday, 08 October 2013, 1:15pm – James Miller – “Repetition and revolution”

All events are from 1:15 – 2:00pm in the Rose Theatre’s Culture Cafe. Entrance is free and you can purchase a coffee and a cake for just £3. Email the organiser (and MFA), Vivienne Raper, at vivienneraper@gmail.com to book an open mic slot or just show up on the day with poetry, prose or anything in between. Readings should be no more than 5 minutes in length.

Please come out and support your local writing community. You might even like to share some of your own writing!

Summer Reading Series at the Rose Theatre: 10 July 2013 Event

Frog Prince Communication

MFA student Vivienne Raper has been hard at work with several other students and the Rose Theatre in Kingston-upon-Thames to organise a brilliant series of public readings beginning on the 10th of July in the Rose Theatre’s Culture Cafe. The series will kick off with N M Browne reading on the theme of transformations. Short stories, poetry and other short forms of writing on this theme are welcomed from the public! Email vivienneraper@gmail.com to book your open mic slot or turn up on the day to see if there are still spaces left. Pieces should be no longer than 5 minutes in length.

Not to worry if you can’t make this event, there will be events in August, September and October with headline readers and Writers-in-Residence Kayo Chingonyi, Mark Barrowcliffe and MFA lecturer James Miller and open mic slots every month.

This is a wonderful opportunity to meet writers, get involved with Kingston Writing School and to get public exposure if you’re a writer, yourself!

Kingston Connections 2013

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Kingston Connections starts in The Rose Theatre Kingston today. An exciting collaboration between the university, Royal Borough of Kingston, The Rose and Creative Youth, we are offering a heady mixture of dance, talks, poetry, theatre, music, writing workshops, science discussions. There’s even the chance to be part of a psychology experiment. Come along and join in!

Highlights today include a talk on genes (10:30am), a poetry reading (12:00pm) and a free workshop on self-publishing (5:30pm).

The full programme (as a PDF) and booking information is available on the Rose Theatre website.

MFA lecturers, tutors and writers in residence to be featured include:

Monday, 24 June 2013, 3:30-5:30pm, Rose Theatre – novelists Adam Baron & James Miller in conversation. Why Do You Write?

Tuesday, 25 June 2013, 12:00-1:00pm, Rose Theatre – poet Jane Yeh reads with Emily Berry.

Tuesday, 25 June 2013, 6:00-7:00pm, Rose Theatre – author Courttia Newland discusses how he has used his own life in his fiction. Life Writing: A Life in Fiction: autobiography and the novel. **Editor’s note: We regret to announce that Courttia’s talk has been cancelled. There are still lots of great events on this week, though, so get thee to Kingston!

Kingston students, alumni and staff can get free or reduced admission to most events!

Annual MFA Anthology, Writings…, Goes to Print, Launch Scheduled

Cover by Hannes Pasqualini, www.papernoise.net

Cover by Hannes Pasqualini, http://www.papernoise.net

 

We are excited to announce that the annual Kingston University MFA anthology, Writings…, goes to print this week. The official launch will be next week and we hope you’ll join us for a reading, drinks and a celebration of the achievements of all out MFAs. This event is free and open to the public so please join our Facebook event and invite your friends. You’ll even get a free copy of the publication!

 

 

Writings… Launch

Thursday, 30 May 2013

7pm

Waggon & Horses Pub

Surbiton, KT6 4TW

Open Night 22 May 2013

Open Evening

Are you thinking about doing an MFA? Do you have questions about the modules, assessments, tutors, admissions process and more? Come meet current staff and students of Kingston University’s Creative Writing department from 4:30-7pm on 22 May 2013.

The event is free and will be held at the Penrhyn Road campus, Kingston upon Thames, Surrey KT1 2EE.

You do not have to attend for the full 2.5 hours; please drop by when you can!

Find out more about the event here.

Book your place here.

You can access the course booklet containing information about the MA and MFA in Creative Writing, the low residency MA and MFA in Creative Writing and the MA in Creative Writing and Pedagogy here.

Hope to see you there!

MFA Dissertation Module Guide – 2013

Following, please find the official module guide for the 2013 MFA Dissertation. This includes requirements, reading lists and an explanation of the dissertation for several forms (Poetry, prose, drama etc.).

More

Christopher Priest

Christopher Priest

Christopher Priest is an English writer of novels, short stories, biographies, critical works and more. He has written radio drama for BBC Radio 4, television programs for Thames TV and HTV and his reviews and features have been published in the Guardian, The Times, the Scotsman and other broadsheets and numerous magazines.

His 1995 novel, The Prestige, won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and, in 2006, was made into a film of the same name starring Christian Bale, Hugh Jackman and Scarlett Johannson. Christopher Nolan directed and it was nominated for two Academy Awards.

Christopher has garnered several international awards, including the Eurocon Award (Yugoslavia), the Kurd Lasswitz Award (Germany), the Ditmar Award (Australia) and Le Grand Prix de L’Imaginaire (France). In 2001, he was awarded France’s Prix Utopia for lifetime achievement. In 2002, he won both the Arthur C. Clarke Award and the British Science Fiction Association (BSFA) Award for his novel The Separation. The Islanders won the 2011 BSFA Award and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award. The Adjacent will be released in June.

Find out more about Christopher on his website: http://www.christopher-priest.co.uk/

 

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Christopher will be reading at 7:30pm on Tuesday, 23 April 2013 in JG 3003, Kingston University, Penrhyn Road. This is a free reading and open to the public.

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SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Fiction

The Adjacent (June 2013)

The Islanders (2011)

The Separation (2002)

The Prestige (1995)

The Quiet Woman (1990)

The Glamour (1988)

The Affirmation (1981)

An Infinite Summer (1979)

The Space Machine (1976)

Fugue for a Darkening Island (1972)

Indoctrinaire (1970)

 

Essays

‘Top Ten Slipstream Books’, The Guardian, May 2003

‘John Wyndham and H G Wells’, a talk given at Midhurst, West Sussex in December 2000

 ‘Independent Cinemas’, The Independent, 1999

 ‘The Beatles’, Chuch, 1986

 

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Christopher Priest’s Recommended Reading List

 

NON-FICTION:

A Sort of Life – Graham Greene

(The first volume of Greene’s autobiography, this is in my experience the only book

that tells the truth about what it is to be a writer.)

Bomber County – Daniel Swift

(About the poetry written by combatants in the second world war.)

The King’s English – Kingsley Amis

(A book of English usage, idiosyncratic and amusing.)

Song of the Sky – Guy Murchie

(A lyrical account of the nature of the sky: winds, clouds, storms, etc.)

 

FICTION:

Disappearances – William Wiser

Loitering with Intent – Muriel Spark

Larry’s Party – Carol Shields

Pavane – Keith Roberts

Collected Stories – Vladimir Nabokov

Pale Fire – Vladimir Nabokov

The Painted Bird – Jerzy Kosinski

Fame – Daniel Kehlmann

Ice – Anna Kavan

Dubliners – James Joyce

The Magus – John Fowles

2666 – Roberto Bolaño

The Voices of Time – J. G. Ballard

St. Patrick’s Day the Irish Way

Sinéad Keegan is an Irish-born writer in the final year of her MFA at Kingston and is currently writing her first novel. Her short stories and poetry and have been published in several magazines and she blogs regularly at http://www.sineadkeegan.blogspot.com. She is also the editor of No Dead White Men.

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On this St. Patrick’s Day, before you don your silly shamrock headgear, dig out your “Kiss me, I’m Irish” t-shirt and go drink yourself sick on green beer, spare a thought for a true Irish tradition: the seanachie.

A seanachie (shan-a-KEE, sort of, Irish pronunciation is problematic in English) is a traditional Irish storyteller. In ancient Ireland, they travelled around the country staying with families and, in return for hospitality, they would share stories. It was a way to keep the old myths alive, to teach history and also to share the news of the day. Naturally, with newspapers, television and the internet, the days of the traveling seanachie have mainly passed in Ireland, but tradition of storytelling and being a storyteller is still strong throughout the country and with Irish people across the globe. Instead of traveling down the narrow country roads to different families every night, today seanachies can be found in the local pubs and at every family gathering. When Irish people meet, the first question we ask is, “What’s the story?” Why say what happened when you can tell the story of what happened?

Many of our storytellers have achieved worldwide acclaim, like William Butler Yeats, Bram Stoker, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, George Bernard Shaw and other heavy hitters. But these literary giants are not all Ireland has produced. There are currently some amazing writers coming out of the country, making waves across the literary world and their work is well worth a look. Here is my incredibly biased and far from comprehensive, taster list of five contemporary Irish writers who work across the literary spectrum:

RoomEmma Donoghue – Emma stormed the literary scene in 2010 with Room, which, among its too numerous to list accolades, was shortlisted for the Orange and Man Booker Prizes, won Hughes & Hughes Irish Novel of the Year and the W.H. Smiths Paperback of the Year Awards. Room is the story of a mother and son held captive and is told by the five-year-old boy. This ‘overnight success’ is actually Emma’s seventh novel. This prolific writer has also published several short story collections, literary history articles and anthologies in addition to writing for the screen, stage and radio.

 

Artemis FowlEoin Colfer – Eoin is the author of the incredibly successful Artemis Fowl series for young adults. Artemis is a hyper-intelligent teen with a troubled family who tries to outwit the characters of Irish fairy stories. In an interesting twist on the usual young adult formula, Artemis is the bad guy. This series, beginning with the eponymous Artemis Fowl, is intriguing for readers of all ages. In 2008 another of his many novels, The Airman, joined the New York Times bestseller list. With successes like these and even the sixth book of Douglas Adam’s Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, And Another Thing, to his name, Eoin Colfer is a literary name for our times.

 

Dervla Murphy - GazaDervla Murphy – Dervla’s first book, Full Tilt: Ireland to India with a Bicycle (1965), established her as a fearless traveler and extraordinary writer. For more than fifty years she has travelled the world, struggling to get away from the paved road. Her latest book, A Month by the Sea: Encounters in Gaza, took her into the homes and lives of people in Palestine. Dervla hasn’t let anything slow her down, not travel mishaps, resistance from immigration authorities or getting older. She’s now in her eighties and shows no signs of slowing down, which is great news for fans of her work.

 

Blackwater LightshipColm Toibin – A novelist, essayist, memoirist, travel writer, journalist and playwright, there is very little to which Colm hasn’t turned his accomplished hand. Twice shortlisted for the Man Booker for The Blackwater Lightship and The Master, his awards are numerous and include the Encore Award, Ferro-Grumley Prize, the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and the Prix du Meilleur Livre. His work has a quiet power, an extraordinary sense of place and gives his readers new ways in which to view the world.

 

 

The GatheringAnne Enright – Anne’s fourth novel, The Gathering, won the Man Booker Prize in 2007 and her other books and short stories have been widely praised. She has also won the Hughes & Hughes Irish Novel of the Year and the Encore Award. Her picture of Ireland is uncompromising and nuanced, accommodating both the country’s deep history and its modern contradictions.

 

 

So perhaps on this St. Patrick’s day, we can all enjoy a good Irish read beside our pint of Guinness, glass of Bailey’s or measure of Jameson’s. Ireland, its people and its history is so much deeper than this international stereotype of drinking. One look at any of these writers shows this in abundance.

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