Writer’s Cafe at the Rose Theatre 03 September 2013 with Mark Barrowcliffe

The Writer’s Cafe summer reading series returns on Tuesday, 03 September 2013 at 1:15pm. Come, enjoy a coffee and some fantastic writing from comedian and author Mark Barrowcliffe  and members of the community. If you have a poem or short selection of prose that fits the theme of “the devil is in the details” please come along and share your work! This is a great opportunity to get some exposure and support. You can email vivienneraper@gmail.com to book an open mic slot or just turn up on the day.

Mark Barrowcliffe

The final Writer’s Cafes featuring MFA lecturer  James Miller  will be on 08 October with open mic slots for community writers. Pieces for reading should be no longer than 5 minutes in length.

This is a wonderful opportunity to meet writers, get involved with Kingston Writing School and to get public reading experience if you’re a writer!

Writer’s Cafe at the Rose Theatre 06 August 2013 with Kayo Chingonyi

The Writer’s Cafe summer reading series returns on Tuesday, 06 August 2013 at 1:15pm. Come, enjoy a coffee and some fantastic writing from spoken word artist Kayo Chingonyi and members of the community. If you have a poem or short selection of prose that fits the theme of “musical words” please come along and share your work! This is a great opportunity to get some exposure and support. You can email vivienneraper@gmail.com to book an open mic slot or just turn up on the day.

Kayo Chingonyi at the Writer's Cafe Flyer

Writer’s Cafes featuring Writer-in-Residence Mark Barrowcliffe and MFA lecturer  James Miller  to follow in September and October with open mic slots every month. Pieces for reading should be no longer than 5 minutes in length.

This is a wonderful opportunity to meet writers, get involved with Kingston Writing School and to get public reading experience if you’re a writer!

Writer’s Cafe – Summer Reading Series 2013

No Dead White Men is delighted to report that the first Writer’s Cafe featuring Nicky Matthews Browne was a success in the lovely setting of the Rose Theatre’s Culture Cafe. Nicky’s reading was well-received as were the readings by the public.

Some of the audience, although they did not intend to participate, felt so inspired as to spontaneously recite poetry from memory.

N M Browne reading at the 10 July 2013 Writer's Cafe

N M Browne reading at the 10 July 2013 Writer’s Cafe

A great time was had by all and we are all looking forward to the events yet to come:

Tuesday, 06 August 2013, 1:15pm – Kayo Chingonyi – “Musical words”

Tuesday, 03 September 2013, 1:15pm – Mark Barrowcliffe – “Devil in the details”

Tuesday, 08 October 2013, 1:15pm – James Miller – “Repetition and revolution”

All events are from 1:15 – 2:00pm in the Rose Theatre’s Culture Cafe. Entrance is free and you can purchase a coffee and a cake for just £3. Email the organiser (and MFA), Vivienne Raper, at vivienneraper@gmail.com to book an open mic slot or just show up on the day with poetry, prose or anything in between. Readings should be no more than 5 minutes in length.

Please come out and support your local writing community. You might even like to share some of your own writing!

Georgia Fitch: Playwright, Radio Scriptwriter and Screenwriter

Georgia Fitch

Georgia Fitch is an East London-born playwright. She began her career as an actress and started writing in order to create more interesting roles that represented the women she knew. Initially, Georgia partnered with Tracy O’Flaherty and they had their first major success with The Footballer’s Wife (1997). Georgia has since independently written numerous plays for the stage and radio as well as a television drama. She is most well-known for Adrenalin Heart (2002) which premiered at the Bush and then went on to be performed at the Tokyo Theatre Festival in 2004.

Georgia was  Writer in Residence at the Bush Theatre, London, with O’Flaherty in 2001. In 2004, she was Writer in Residence at BBC Radio. From 2006 to 2008, she was on attachment to the Royal Court and Soho Theatre. She is currently Writer-in-Residence at Kingston University.

Her most recent work, Blair’s Children, co-written with April de Angelis, Anders Lustgarten, Mark Norfolk and Paula Stanic, opened at The Cockpit Theatre, Marylebone on 05 June 2013 and runs until 21 June 2013. You can find more information and purchase tickets for Blair’s Children here.

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Bibliography:

Plays:

Blair’s Children – The Cockpit Theatre, 2013

Fit and Proper People – Soho Theatre/RSC, 2011

Dirty Dirty Princess – National Theatre, New Connections, 2009

I Like Mine with a Kiss – Bush Theatre, 2007

Adrenalin  Heart – Bush Theatre, 2002,2004

Alone – Etc Theatre, 2000

Arrivals – Old Red Lion, 1999

Come Dancing – (Co-written with Tracy O’Flaherty) Old Red Lion, 1998

The Footballer’s Wife – (Co-written with Tracy O’Flaherty) Riverside Studios, 1997

Radio:

Up The Junction– BBC Radio 4 – 2013

The Mother of – BBC Radio 4, 2007

Untitled Lover – BBC Radio 4, 2007
Fortunes Always Hiding – BBC Radio 4, 2005

Romeo and Juliet in Southwark –  BBC, 2004

Produced in collaboration with Shakespeare’s Globe and Kingsdale School, Dulwich

Adrenalin Heart – BBC Radio 3, 2003

Television:

Darke Town – (Co-written with Lucy Catherine and Ryan Craig) BBC Drama, 2006

Other:

Dis-Assembly – (An installation created with Runa Islam) Sepentine Gallery, 2006

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Recommended Reading:

Plays to read:

A Raisin in the Sun – Lorraine Hansberry

The Visit – Fredrich Durrenmatt

Saved – Edward Bond

Whistle in the Dark – Tom Murphy

Ecstasy – Mike Leigh

Masterpieces – Sarah Daniels

Films to view:

Cathy Come Home – Ken Loach

Nil by Mouth – Gary Oldman

A Seperation – Asghar Farhadi

Source Materials:

How Plays Work – David Edgar

The Art Of Dramatic Writing – Lajos Egri

The Writers Journey – Christopher Vogler

The Hero’s Journey – Joseph Campbell

Dark nights of the Soul – Thomas Moore

Martin Daws

Martin DawsMartin Daws is a performance poet and spoken word artist. He leads community and youth workshops across the country and regularly performs his work at events around the UK and Ireland. He was declared Farrago Slam Champ twice, was runner-up for both the John Tripp Award for Spoken Poetry in 2007and the Glastonbury Festival Slam in 2008. His 2008 debut at the Edinburgh Festival earned a five star review. He has been published in numerous international journals and is the author of Skin Tight the Sidewalk, a book/CD. He is Poet in Residence at Moelyci Environment Centre, North Wales. In April 2013 Martin Daws was announced by Literature Wales as The Young People’s Laureate for Wales. In this role Martin is working with young people all over Wales developing their engagement and enjoyment with spoken word poetry. Martin blogs at www.youngpeopleslaureate.org. Follow his twitter feeds @martindaws and @yplwales.

In the late 1980s Martin began DJ-ing in London and in 1994, after experiencing the New York slam scene, he combined his passion for music and language into performance poetry. His work still retains strong ties to music, running youth workshops on creative writing and rap, and collaborating with various musicians. Notably, he has worked with dancer Sarah Mumford on the WID performance ‘Don’t Step on the Cracks’. His experimental performances with electro-acoustic composer Rob Mackay have toured four continents.

Martin is a Writer-in-Residence with Kingston Writing School and on 19 March 2013, he taught a Teaching & Writing Workshop.

More information about Martin and his work is available at his website www.martindaws.com.

 

Bibliography:

Skin Tight The Sidewalk, 2009

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Recommended Reading:

The Invisible Man – Ralph Ellison

Smokin’ Lovely – Willie Perdomo

Said the Shotgun to the Head – Saul Williams

The Wasteland – T.S. Elliot

Learning to be White – Thandeka

Barrie Keeffe

Barrie Keeffe

Barrie Keeffe is a London-born dramatist and screenwriter, best-known for his screenplay for the 1981 film The Long Good Friday, starring Bob Hoskins and Helen Mirren. He began his career as an actor and journalist before turning to writing full-time in 1975. His first television play, Substitute, was produced in 1972 and his first theatre play, Only a Game, the following year. He was writer-in-residence at the Shaw Theatre in 1977, the next year, was resident playwright with the Royal Shakespeare Company, and associate writer with the Theatre Royal Stratford East from 1986 to 1991. His theatre plays have been produced in 25 countries. He has written stage plays, screenplays, radio plays, television scripts and novels.

Barrie’s accolades include The Mystery Writers of America Edgar Allen Poe Award for The Long Good Friday, Paris Critics Prix Revelation for Gotcha and the Giles Cooper Best Radio Plays Award for Heaven Scent. He was appointed a United Nations Ambassador for the 50th anniversary year in 1995 and, in 2010, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Letters by the University of Warwick.

He has taught at City University London, the Skyros Writers Lab in Greece, the Collaldra Writers’ School and Retreat in Italy, Ruskin College Oxford and is a visiting fellow at Christ’s College, Cambridge. He is currently a Writer-in-Residence at Kingston University where he teaches on both the Creative Writing MA and MFA, and supervises dissertations.

Barrie’s screenplay, The Long Good Friday, was on the MFA Critical Reading list and, on 19 March 2013, he taught a master class on film, stage and novel writing.

 

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Selected Bibliography:

Stage plays:

Only a Game (1973)

Gimme Shelter (1977)

A Mad World My Masters (1977, 1984)

Barbarians (1977)

Sus (1979)

Black Lear (1980)

Better Times (1985)

Not Fade Away (1990)

The Long Good Friday (1997)

Shadows on the Sun (2001)

Still Killing Time (2006)

Television:

Substitute (1972)

Not Quite Cricket (1977)

Champions (1978)

Waterloo Sunset (1979)

King (1984)

Screenplays:

The Long Good Friday (1981)

Sus (2010)

Novels:

Gadabout (1969)

No Excuses (1983)

 

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Barrie Keeffe’s Recommended Reading List:

Into the Woods: A Five Act Journey into Story – John Yorke

Adventures in the Screen Trade – William Goldman

A Whore’s Profession – David Mamet

Five Screenplays: The Servant, The Pumpkin Eater, The Quiller Memorandum, The Go-Between, Accident – Harold Pinter

Crash – Ian Sinclair (The Cronenberg film)

Harold Pinter: Life and Work – Michael Billington

John Osborne: A Patriot for Us – John Heilpern

Arthur Miller: A Life – Marin Gottfried

Double Act: A Life of Tom Stoppard – Ira Nadel

Samuel Beckett: A Biography – Deirdre Bair

O’Neil: A Life with Monte Cristo – Arthur and Barbara Gelb

The Script Selling Game – Kathie Fong Yoneda

In the Frame: My Life in Words and Pictures – Helen Mirren

Being an Actor – Simon Callow

What’s My Motive? – Michael Simpkins

The End of the Affair – Graham Greene (novel)

The End of the Affair – Neil Jordan (film)

Wendy Cope OBE

Wendy Cope OBE. Photo by Adrian Harvey.

Wendy Cope OBE. Photo by Adrian Harvey.

Wendy Cope is an award-winning English poet renowned for her wit and humour. After reading History at St. Hilda’s College, Oxford, she then spent many years teaching primary school in London, before making the switch to full time freelance writer in 1986. She has been a tutor on a number of Arvon courses and still occasionally runs workshops in academic settings and elsewhere.

Her first collection, Making Cocoa for Kingsley Amis, introduced the world to her clear imagery and biting wit and became a bestseller. She has since published several more collections, which have all been enthusiastically received both by critics and the public. She has also edited a number of poetry anthologies including Is That the New Moon (1989) and The Funny Side: 101 Humorous Poems (1998). Drawing on her experience as a primary school teacher, she has also written a narrative poem, The River Girl (1991) and two children’s books,   Twiddling Your Thumbs (1988) and Going for a Drive (2010).

In 1987 she won a Cholmondeley Award for poetry and in 1995 she was awarded the Michael Braude Award for Light Verse. In 1998, BBC Radio 4 listeners voted her their choice to succeed Ted Hughes at Poet Laureate. If I Don’t Know (2001) was shortlisted for the Whitbread Poetry Award and in 2010 she was made an O.B.E. in the Queen’s Birthday honours. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.

Wendy Cope is part of the 2013 MFA Residency Series. She is also a writer in residence at Kingston Writing School. She regularly works with students and does readings. On 26 February 2013 she taught the MFA Writing and Teaching workshop talking about her experiences, strategies and motivations as a creative writing teacher and also modelling a poetry workshop.

Selected Bibliography

Poetry Collections:

Making Cocoa for Kingsley Amis (1986)

Serious Concerns (1992)

If I Don’t Know (2001)

Family Values (2011)

Narrative Poem

The River Girl (1991)

Edited Anthologies

Is That the New Moon (1989)

The Orchard Book of Funny Poems (1993)

The Funny Side: 101 Humorous Poems (1998)

The Faber Book of Bedtime Stories (1999)

Heaven on Earth: 101 Happy Poems (2001)

 

Books for Children

Twiddling Your Thumbs (1988)

Going for a Drive (2010)

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As with all our visiting writers, Wendy has kindly supplied a recommended reading list.

Some books I’ve enjoyed recently:

 

Poetry

Stag’s Leap by Sharon Olds

The Overhaul by Kathleen Jamie

Mountain Home: the Wilderness Poetry of Ancient China, translated by David Hinton

Fiction

The Glass Room by Simon Mawer

Skios by Michael Frayn

Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel

Keras by Simon Rae (a book for children)

Non-fiction

Gig by Simon Armitage

Andrea Stuart

Andrea Stuart is a prose writer who was born in Caribbean, lived briefly in the US and was educated in the UK. She began her career as a journalist, then branched into publishing and television documentary production. She studied English at the University of East Anglia and French at the Sorbonne. Since 1996, Andrea has published three nonfiction, historical books, including Josephine: The Rose of Martinique (originally published in 2003 by Macmillan as The Rose of Martinique: A Biography of Napoleon’s Josephine), which won the Enid McLeod Literary Award. She has taught at Kingston University as a Writer in Residence since 2011. She also teaches at Faber Academy, does private mentoring and regularly reviews books for The Independent. She has been the co-editor of Black Film Bulletin and the fiction editor of Critical Quarterly. Her work has appeared in numerous publications in both the UK and the US. Her most recent book, Sugar in the Blood, is a multi-generational story of Andrea’s own family history of slavery and plantation life in Barbados and was published by Portobello Books in June of this year.

Selected Bibliography

Showgirls (Jonathan Cape Ltd, 1996) – a collective biography of showgirls from Marlene Dietrich to Mae West to Madonna

The Rose of Martinique: A Biography of Napoleon’s Josephine (Pan, 2004) – a sweeping, cradle to grave biography of one of history’s most interesting women

Sugar in the Blood (Potobello Books Ltd, 2012) – a look at Andrea’s own family history of slavery and sugar plantation ownership

Recommended Reading:

Andrea says she could go on forever about fantastic books to read, but here’s her current recommended reading list:

Fyodor Dostoyevsky – The Idiot
Guiseppa Lampedusa – The Leopard
George Elliot – Silas Marner
Gabriel Garcia Marquez – Love in the Time of Cholera
Jane Austen – Sense and Sensibility
Richard Ellison – Invisible Man
James Baldwin – Go Tell It On The Mountain
Toni Morrison – Beloved
Mario Puzo – The Godfather
Carl Hiaassen – Sick Puppy

Fiona Curran – Poetry Critical Reading

Attention current MFA students: For Fiona Curran’s Advanced Critical Reading class on the 20th of November (week 9) please read the following poems, which she has selected for consideration.

Brancusi’s Golden Bird

I Would Like To Be a Dot in a Painting by Miró – Moniza Alvi

Ophelia and Millais – Mary De Bow

At La Ferté – Fiona Curran

Stravinsky – Paolo Buzzi (1874-1956), Translated from the Italian by Samuel Putnam

The Act – William Scammell

Wishing you a poetic reading week.

Fiona Sampson

Fiona Sampson is an award-winning poet and academic and is editor of Poetry Review.

Her most recent books include a new edition of Percy Bysshe Shelley for Faber (2011, Poetry Book Society Book Club Choice) and Music Lessons: The Newcastle Poetry Lectures (2011).

She is published in more than thirty languages, and her eleven books in translation including Patuvachki Dnevnik, awarded the Zlaten Prsten (Macedonia, 2004).

In 2009, she received a Cholmondeley Award and was elected an FRSL; she has since been elected to the Council of the Royal Society of Literature.

Fiona has received the Newdigate Prize, writers’ awards from the Arts Councils of England and Wales and the Society of Authors and, in, the United States, the Literary Review‘s Charles Angoff Award. ‘Trumpeldor Beach’ was shortlisted for the 2006 Forward Prize for best single poem.

She was educated at the Universities of Oxford and Nijmegen and has a PhD in the philosophy of language. She was Arts and Humanities Research Council Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University from 2002-2005.

Fiona Sampson is internationally recognised for her pioneering residencies in health care and contributes to the Guardian, the Irish Times and other publications. Her translations include Jaan Kaplinski, an anthology of younger Central European poets, and Orient Express, of which she was founding editor.

She is currently Distinguished Writer at the University of Kingston, and this year she serves as a judge for the Griffin Prizes and the Cholmondeley Awards.  Her critical survey of contemporary British poetry, Beyond the Lyric (Chatto) appears this September, and her next collection, Coleshill, also from Chatto, in January 2013.

She has been the editor of Poetry Review since 2005.

Click here to read a recent Interview with Fiona Sampson, on the Write out Loud website.

Fiona Sampson will be reading a selection of her poems on Thursday 23rd Feb, at Kingston University at 7:30pm in Room 5002, John Galsworthy Building, Penrhyn Road, Kingston-Upon-Thames

Selected bibliography

  • The Self on the Page: Theory and Practice of Creative Writing in Personal Development (with Celia Hunt) Jessica Kingsley (1998)
  • The Healing Word (1998)
  • Creative Writing In Health And Social Care (editor) Jessica Kingsley, (2004)
  • A Fine Line: New Poetry from East and Central Europe (with Jean Boase-Beier and
  • Alexandra Buchler, Arc, 2004)
  • Evening Brings Everything Back (translations of Jaan Kaplinski, Bloodaxe, 2004)
  • Folding the Real (Seren, 2001, published in Romanian by Editura Paralela 45, 2004)
  • Writing: Self and Reflexivity co-authored with Celia Hunt (2005)
  • The Distance Between Us (Seren, 2006)
  • On Listening (Salt, 2007)
  • Day co-authored with Amir Or (2007)
  • Common Prayer (2007), short-listed for the 2007 T. S. Eliot Prize
  • A Century of Poetry Review (Carcanet, 2009)
  • Poetry Writing: the Expert Guide (Robert Hale, 2009)
  • Rough Music (Carcanet Press, 2010)

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